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Things I Know To Be True: Cloe Coscoy on Giving it Your All and Airport Security Lines

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Cloe Coscoy, 19, is a member of Team USA and was the 2019 Youth Pan-American Champion. She placed second at the 2020 Bouldering Nationals. She’s currently living in Salt Lake City, Utah and attending the University of Utah.

[Also Read: Things I Know To Be True: Top American Climber Dylan Barks Answers Big Questions]

Coscoy continues our new series, Things I Know To Be True, where top climbers answer big questions.

 

If I could talk to my 10-year-old self, I would tell myself to start climbing, ASAP.

Giving it your all is almost impossible. I think everyone can give more, that’s what pushes us to try harder.

Clipping the chains is a reflection of the gains.

 

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Rest days are SO important. I’m still learning to trust that sometimes taking a rest day is the best thing for me, even if it seems like everyone else is training.

Failing hard can be the best motivation, but sometimes it just hurts.

My bedroom is really organized.

Coscoy, with Lola the dog, at Joes Valley. (Photo: Ross Fulkerson)

Junk food is delicious, sometimes, not too much.

If I couldn’t climb anymore, I would compete in another sport. I need an outlet for my competitive drive.

The hardest lesson in the world is learning that even if you do everything right, it may not be enough. At the same time I feel it’s important to really experience and enjoy your process, regardless of the outcome

The world feels chaotic when I’m in the airport security line at 6AM.

When I’m in the zone, I think… nothing. When I’m truly “in the zone” on the wall, I can hardly remember what I did when it’s over. My skills and experience take over and I trust my practice to guide my climbing.

People are surprised to learn that I speak French!

Three things I would give up if I could climb a grade harder are chopping vegetables (I REALLY like cutting vegetables), my left ear, and ice cream.