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Olympics

Meet Our Olympic Crew

Meet USA's qualified Olympians for Tokyo 2020: Colin Duffy, Kyra Condie, Nathaniel Coleman, and Brooke Raboutou.

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Colin Duffy

As a multi-time Youth World Champion, Duffy won back-to-back in lead in his age division in 2017 and 2018, a  sign that he would be a force to be reckoned with when he entered the adult scene. One year later, Duffy made waves in a stacked adult field at USA Climbing’s 2019 Combined Invitational, placing fourth. Duffy is the youngest of the American Olympians, and is a member of Team ABC, the squad that produced Olympian Brooke Raboutou. Like Raboutou, Duffy excels in all disciplines, evidenced by the fact that he posted a personal best speed time—twice—in a single competition in 2020 (the aforementioned Combined Invitational). Duffy, 17, may be young, but it is hard to argue that he doesn’t have a shot at an Olympic podium—especially if he continues to improve in the coming weeks and months.

 

Kyra Condie

Condie is as credentialed as any competitor in the combined discipline heading into the Olympics, and won the combined portion of the Pan-American Championship in 2018. The following year she won the inaugural combined Invitational hosted by USA Climbing. Condie punched her ticket for the Tokyo Olympics by placing seventh in the combined discipline at the Toulouse qualification event. Amid it all, she made the novel combined format seem as if it had existed for decades. Condie had severe spinal curvature as a child, eventually leading to the surgical fusion of 10 vertebrae. “Most of the time I don’t notice my back at all when I’m climbing, but when I do, it can be really discouraging,” she said on March 12, 2021—a day that marked the 11-year anniversary of her surgery. Suffice it to say, it all makes Condie’s climbing accomplishments and her Olympic qualification even more impressive. 

 

Nathaniel Coleman

Coleman has long been considered one of the best American boulderers, particularly due to quadruple wins at USA Climbing’s Bouldering Nationals (in 2016, 2017, 2018, and 2020). Still, his second-place at the United States’ inaugural Combined Invitational in January 2019—where he placed behind Zach Galla—was something of a revelation. There, it became evident that Coleman was not just broadening his skills in the other disciplines, he was approaching true mastery in all of them. More recently, Coleman showcased his veteran savvy and his unwavering self-belief at the National Team Trials in March of 2021. When his initial attempts were unsuccessful, Coleman stayed composed; with time for one final attempt, he dialed in the beta for a big deadpoint finish beyond the zone hold, and topped the problem. When it counts the most, Coleman is able to execute with a combination of skill and poise.  

 

Brooke Raboutou

Raboutou was the first American climber to qualify for the Olympics. While most competitors forced themselves to appreciate the combined discipline upon the announcement of climbing’s Olympic inclusion, Raboutou has had an affinity for the full complement of lead climbing, bouldering, and speed climbing since her days on the youth circuit. Podium places in the lead and bouldering disciplines of the National Team Trials earlier this year proved she is in peak competition form as the postponed Olympics approach. Raboutou is arguably the most popular and well-known American climber right now behind Alex Honnold and Tommy Caldwell. If she can continue to parlay her Olympic exposure into mainstream attention—while still winning competitions at the highest level—Raboutou could reach levels of celebrity in the social media age that no other American climbing competitor has.